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Talk To Frank

About Talk To Frank

In the UK, Talk to Frank has been operating the anti-drugs campaign for a long time on its own. But, have people quit drug abuse through this?

The drug education in the entire UK received a total turn around ten years back when the police Swat team ran into a rural kitchen somewhere in the UK. Grim warnings about how drugs could mess you up and genuine pleas to resist the pushers that were creeping around every playground were gone. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


In the main advertisement, an adolescent kid brings in a police grab squad to capture his mom when she recommends they have a tranquil chat about medications. The message, "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So Talk to Frank", was brand new as well.


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. Also, there's no sign that Frank is a government agent - something that is rare in the history of campaigns paid for by government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Majority of the ads in Europe now follow the footsteps of Frank in trying to be sincere and allowing the teenagers the right to choose. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the UK, the Above the Influence campaign has cost the federal government millions of dollars and uses humour and cautionary stories to encourage people to choose positive alternatives to drugs The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

According to studies into a United States anti-drugs campaign between 1999 and 2004, advertisements showing the undesirable effects of substance abuse can frequently urge younger people who are marginalised to experiment with substances.


Frank made brand new ground - and received a lot of criticism from the conservative opposition politicians at that time - for being brave enough to put forward that substances might provide highs and lows.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. However, the goal of the ad was to be upfront with young people about the effects of drugs so that Frank could establish some accountability.

A 67% of the youth say they would ask Frank for advice related to drugs according to the Home Office. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. The argument is that this is proof that the approach is working.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

Substance use in the United Kingdom has decreased by 9% in the ten years since the campaign was introduced, though the pros say a lot of this is because of a decline in the use of cannabis use, probably connected to younger people's changing attitudes towards smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a state drug education services together settled by the by the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government in 2003. It is envisioned to lessen the utilization of both lawful and illicit medications by instructing youngsters as well as teenagers about the potential impacts of medications and liquor. FRANK has run lots of media campaigns on radio and the internet.


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Services

FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs:

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email help
  • A confidential live chat service, available from 2pm-6pm daily
  • A service to find treatment and counselling