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Getting Help - Treatment

What's substance Dependency?

That chronic health condition where people cannot control the way they search for and make use of drugs irrespective of the fact that this can damage their health and alter their mental state forever is called Drug addiction. These adjustments in the mind can prompt to the hurtful practices found in individuals who take drugs. Drug dependency is a degenerative illness. Relapse is a situation where the person goes back to drug use after making efforts to overcome addiction.


Using drugs out of one's volition is the road that leads to drug addiction. With time, the user is unable to stop voluntarily the need to use the drug. Looking for and using the substance becomes uncontrollable. This unrelenting craving results from the effects of the drug on the brain over time. The parts of the brain messed up by the drug dependency are the ones dealing with recompense and inspiration, knowledge and recollection, and responsible actions.

Dependency is an illness that affects behaviour and the brain.


Can Drug Addiction Be Treated?

There is, but it is a long journey. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. For most patients, long term often repeated care is needed to help them stop using and continue on to get their lives back.


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An addict in treatment must work toward the following:

  • desist from drug use
  • abstain from drugs
  • be profitable in the family, at work and in the public arena

Principles Behind Effective Treatment

These values have been observed since some scientific research was done in the mid-70s as the foundation for a successful recovery plan:

  • Though a complex brain altering illness, drug dependency can be successfully treated.
  • No single treatment is appropriate for everybody.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available.
  • Viable treatment addresses the greater part of the patient's needs, not only his or her drug intake.
  • It is extremely important to remain under treatment for a very long period of time.
  • The most frequently used forms of treatment are counselling and other behavioural therapies.
  • A crucial part of treatment is medication, particularly when combined with behavioural therapy.
  • In order to accommodate the needs of the patient, treatment methods must be appraised with changes in the patient's needs.
  • Some other associated mental problems must be taken care of by treatments.
  • Medically assisted detoxification is just the very first step of the treatment.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • When in treatment, possible drug use must be constantly monitored.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

There are several steps to effective treatment:

  • detox (the process when the body cleanses itself of a substance)
  • behavioural counselling
  • medication (for tobacco, opioid, or alcohol addiction)
  • evaluation and treatment for mental health issues like anxiety and depression that co-occur with addiction
  • Relapse prevention through long-term check-ups

Using a wide range of treatments tailored to the needs of the patient is a key to success.


Treatment ought to incorporate both therapeutic and emotional well-being services as required. Follow-up care may comprise group or family-based recuperation supportive networks.


How Are Meds Utilised As A Part Of Drug Compulsion Treatment?

Managing withdrawal symptoms, preventing relapse, and treating coexisting conditions are accomplished through medication use.

  • Withdrawal During the detoxification process, medication helps suppress the physical reactions. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," rather just the initial phase all the while. Patients normally go back to the use of drugs if their treatment is not continued after detoxification. The SAMHSA, 2014 study has shown that about 80% of detox programmes use prescription drugs.
  • Relapse Prevention Medicines used in the detoxing programme help the brain to restore to its normal functions easier and stop the desire for the drug. Alcohol addiction, tobacco (nicotine) and opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers) have medications for their treatments. Researchers are creating different solutions to manage stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) dependence It's really common for addicts to use more than one drug and they will need treatment for each substance.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to:

  • Change their behaviour toward and the way the think about their drug use
  • Adopt healthier psychosocial competency
  • Continue with varying forms of treatment like medication

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

Outpatient behavioural treatment incorporates a wide assortment of projects for patients who visit a behavioural health counsellor on a fixed schedule. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These programmes usually provide types of behavioural therapy like:

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy, which teaches patients how to recognize, avoid, and deal with any situation that will make them more likely to use drugs
  • Multidimensional family therapy, which is for teenage addicts and their families to understand all of the factors influencing the patterns of drug abuse and works on improving the family's ability to function
  • motivational interviewing, which gets most of the addicts disposed to work on their behaviour and commence treatment
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

Treatment is once in awhile escalated at to begin with, where patients go to numerous outpatient sessions every week. Subsequent to finishing escalated treatment, patients move to customary outpatient treatment, which meets less frequently and for decreased hours every week to help manage their recuperation.


For a patient with severe problems, including coexisting conditions, inpatient or residential treatment is very effective. The around the clock care available at residential rehabilitation centres includes safe boarding facilities and close monitoring of patients. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


Benefits of taking an inpatient treatment programme:

  • Therapeutic communities which are exceedingly organised programs in which patients stay at a home, normally for 6 to 12 months. Everybody at the facility, whether caregivers or administrators and fellow patients play a role in the recovery of the patient helping them cope with the changes and challenges of withdrawal.
  • Also available are short blood cleansing programmes offered at the residential facilities to rid the body of drugs and set the foundation for a longer treatment programme.
  • Short term, supervised housing for patients called recovery housing is sometimes utilized after residential treatment. Recovery housing can assist a person to complete the changeover to an independent life-for example, assisting him/her learn how to tackle finances or look for a job, as well as linking them to the community's support services.

Problems Of Re-Admission

Because drug abuse changes the way the brain functions, a lot of things can trigger drug cravings. Those undergoing treatment, especially in prison or inpatient facilities will find it very useful, as they will understand the best way to handle and overcome the triggers that will face them after recovery.