Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

Al-Anon Family Groups

Al-Anon History

A family of support groups for people who have been affected by alcoholism in their family is Al-Anon. The goal of theses groups is to be advantageous and therapeutic.


Al- Anon is a support organization for the friends and family members of problem drinkers, founded in 1951. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the first alcoholic support group that was started by the husband of Lois Wilson who went on to later start her own support group, Al-Anon. Lois W sort to help others suffering at the hands of alcoholics like herself. Al-Anon is an organization which supports itself through donations provided by members. There are meetings available through the assistance of family members and friends of alcoholics to cope with and better serve the interests of their loved ones even if they are in different stages of recovery.


To assist members by having them understand they aren't alone in their struggle, is the principal target of Al-Anon.


Alcoholism Is A Family Illness

Al-Anon considers the problem of alcoholism as a family illness because of the negative impact it has both on the alcoholic and the people surrounding them. It is integral for the alcoholic's recovery to have a family and friend support system around them.

Helping the addict recuperate should be the main concern of the family members and the friends. Support meetings can help deal about these issues in the best way while also making members understand that alcoholism should be treated as a family illness.


Alateen- Al-Anon Meetings Intended For Teenagers

The youth are also affected by alcoholism in their family, so Al-Anon has formed a wing to help the youngsters called Al-teen.

Teens get to associate with each other and share experiences of how alcoholism has affected them.


Reasons To Partake In An Al-Anon Group

The people in the group are struggling like you or are going through what you are experiencing as a victim of alcoholism. People are different, although, Al-Anon members have all had similar experiences with their struggles. With this program, you get to share experiences with people who have faced situations similar to yours. There are Al-Anon meetings available all across our country. Phone us on 0800 246 1509 , and we'll help you find the one near you.


The Results Of These Meetings

If you know someone who is an alcoholic, then Al-Anon is the best place for you. Al-Anon can assist you if you are anxious about someone's drinking habit or if their lifestyle affects you personally.

Some of the attendees are reluctant to go to their first meeting because they do not know what to expect. What you must remember when you attend an Al-Anon meeting:

  • Al-Anon is anonymous meaning you do not identify yourself in the meeting
  • Every member from the organization has been affected by alcoholism regardless of whether it is a personal problem or through a family member
  • Getting things off your chest is one way of recovery encouraged in this group although it is not mandatory
  • The Meetings Usually Vary
  • You may find some more beneficial to you than others.
  • There is no religious base for Al-Anon
  • These meetings are focused on the 12 Step program by Al-Anon

The meetings conducted by Al-Anon have a simple formula which gives the attendees the option of taking what they prefer and leaving behind the rest. The shared stories, of experiences, hardships, and victories encourages members to know how to handle their experiences.


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The 12 Parts Of Al-Anon

As a rule, group meetings begin with reading of Al Anon 12 Step program. The Alcoholics Anonymous started the 12 step recovery program that is being used in the Al-Anon meetings. Similarly to AA, Al-Anon members rely on a facilitator who guides them through the steps and who is always ready to support when the going gets tough. These steps are the following:

  • We admit that we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • Members learn to accept alcoholism as a disease they cannot control in others.
  • Accepted that a Power greater than ourselves could bring back our mental health.
  • Members frequently motivate themselves to the brink by trying to reform or control their loved one.
  • After they admit they are powerless, they learn how to accept that they can be helped to regain their sanity.
  • Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  • Learning how to forgive is an extremely important step of the program, together with acceptance.
  • Made a searching and a fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  • Identifying that your life is being affected by alcoholism is one way of getting the best help.
  • A list of how they may have offended themselves or their loved ones (such as with threats) is made by attendees.
  • Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to others human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  • Writing each problem enables them to examine them one by one.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • This step is highly essential as it is the complete acceptance of the recovery process supported by a Higher Power.
  • calmly begged Him to remove our drawbacks.
  • This part of the twelve step process helps people realize how controlling or judgmental they have been towards an alcoholic and how counterproductive it is.
  • Drew up a list of all people we had harmed, and became willing to right a wrong for them all.
  • Very often, righting a wrong starts with yourself.
  • Many people blame themselves for their addiction of their loved one.
  • They must learn to forgive and make it right for themselves.
  • Made direct amends to such people wherever possible unless to do so would injure them or others.
  • When you decide to make amends, Then follows the action of doing so.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Going through the 12 steps is a process which will take time.
  • Members are ready with an inventory, yet making an error is common.
  • Step 10 provides a recognition that this is an ongoing process.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  • This step is a personal, spiritual one; it comprises acceptance and comfort in view of the great stress of recovery.
  • Having experienced a spiritual awakening thanks to these steps, we tried to spread the word to other people, and to always practice these principles.
  • This stage appreciates the fact that the process is long and doesnt end after a while.
  • Members are then motivated to assist other members with what they have learned.

Recognising The Higher Power

Despite Al-Anon not being a religious program of any kind, the members within do have an acceptance of a greater power. However, the notion of "higher power" can be interpreted depending on one's personal beliefs. Al-Anon does not interfere with a member's religious convictions.